Academic alacrity

Senior remarks on scholastic achievements

Before the start of school, seniors Carsyn Chambers (left) and Audrey Pauletti (right) share a moment of friendship in the band hall.

Daniel Lackey

Before the start of school, seniors Carsyn Chambers (left) and Audrey Pauletti (right) share a moment of friendship in the band hall.

Daniel Lackey, Editor In-Chief

Getting five hours of shut-eye every night is a luxury for senior Audrey Pauletti.
In spite of this four-year reality, Pauletti managed to earn a spot as a National Merit Commended recipient in October while advancing to the second round of District band auditions early December, even advanced to the state level for UIL copy-editing in May of 2019.

I am thankful for all the opportunities that I have had thus far, and I hope to continue to be successful in the future.”

— Audrey Pauletti

“I feel that I have been generally successful for the amount of effort I put into what I do,” Pauletti said. “I am thankful for all the opportunities that I have had thus far, and I hope to continue to be successful in the future.”
Amid her achievements, every waking minute of Pauletti’s life is spent on extracurriculars and academic obligations: exerting energy to finish assignments for her AP courses—without trying to stress too much, even if she has to stay up late to finish something to her satisfaction; equipping herself with ways to combat cyber threats as a member of cyber patriots; and contributing to the Ranger Band by posing as a tenor saxophone section leader, organizing uniforms and other garments as a quartermaster, and playing the oboe for concert band and individual purposes.

“Audrey is someone who immediately comes to mind who is someone of the highest character, and super dependable,” band director Matt Boening said. “She’s one of those student leaders, who, when I’m about to ask her to do something, she comes up and shows me that she’s already done it. Always one step ahead. Always thinking ahead. I’ve loved having her in this group all these years.”
For Pauletti, the driving force behind her devotion to all things school-related stems from not only her matured confidence, but with the rewards high school offers.
“The relationships and interpersonal skills that I have acquired have given me background and skills that will be very beneficial in my future endeavors after I graduate,” Pauletti said. “Also, I know that the harder I work now, the easier college will be.”
Affecting her peers in both an academic setting and outside of school has also become commonplace.

“[Audrey’s] a good person,” junior Kate Fey said. “Not only does she demonstrate her willingness to work, but she does it with a sort of humility and realness that highlights her accomplishments, as well as making success seem possible for others too. She is a friend, a real one. She’s honest, and tells you if you’ve messed up, but even if you have, she’ll stick around and help you correct it.”

[Audrey’s] a good person. Not only does she demonstrate her willingness to work, but she does it with a sort of humility and realness that highlights her accomplishments.”

— Junior Kate Fey

Long after she wakes up after a five-hour night’s sleep, walks across the stage of Strahan Coliseum at the end of May with her fulfillments under her belt, and earns her diploma, Pauletti hopes to leave a mark on the school.

“I hope that people can remember me as someone who always helped them and provided encouragement or a good laugh when they needed it most,” Pauletti said.

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